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7 March 2017

Women’s Pay Day

In a reversal of Equal Pay Day, which takes place in November on the date on which the average woman stops getting paid, compared to the average man, new analysis by the TUC, prepared for Women’s Pay Day – the 7th March – reveals that the average woman has to wait nearly a fifth of a year (66 days) before she starts to get paid, compared to the average man.

The current gender pay gap for all full-time and part-time male and female employees stands at 18 per cent. This pay gap means that across the board women effectively work for free for the first 66 days of the year.

In a number of key industries – even in jobs dominated by female workers – women have to wait until even later in the year for their Women’s Pay Day:

  • In education, the gender pay gap is currently 27 per cent, so the average woman effectively works for free for more than a quarter of the year (97 days) and has to wait until the 7 April before she starts earning the same as the average man.
  • In health and social work, the average woman waits 69 days for her Women’s Pay Day on 10 March.
  • The longest wait for Women’s Pay Day comes in finance and insurance. There the gender pay gap is the equivalent of 137 days, more than a third of the year.

Women’s Pay Day by industry

Industry
% gender pay gap
Number of days
Women’s Pay Day
Transport and storage
4
14
14/01/2017
Accommodation and food services
4
14
14/01/2017
Sewerage and waste management
4
15
15/01/2017
Admin and support services
9
31
31/01/2017
Agriculture, forestry and fishing
14
49
18/02/2017
Real estate
14
52
21/02/2017
Arts, entertainment and recreation
14
52
21/02/2017
Construction
16
59
28/02/2017
Public admin and defence
16
60
01/03/2017
Average
18
66 days
07/03/2017
Wholesale and retail, motor vehicle repair
19
68
09/03/2017
Human health and social work
19
69
10/03/2017
Information and communication
20
72
13/03/2017
Manufacturing
22
80
21/03/2017
Professional, scientific and technical
24
86
27/03/2017
Other service activities
26
96
06/04/2017
Education
27
97
07/04/2017
Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning
28
102
12/04/2017
Financial and insurance
37
137
17/05/2017
 Source the Office for National Statistics,  Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings,  2016.


TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said:

“The UK has one of the worst gender pay gaps in Europe. Even in industries where women dominate, like education, they get paid far less than men. Paying lip service to the problem is not good enough. Companies that don’t pay women the same as men for work of equal value are breaking the law. But with Employment Tribunal fees of £1,200, too few women can afford to access justice when bad bosses break the law."

The TUC is calling on the government to:
  1. End discriminatory pay: through equal pay audits, tougher sanctions on employers who don’t play fair, and ending employment tribunal fees so women who are discriminated against can access justice.
  2. Tackle occupational segregation: getting more women into better paid jobs like engineering through good careers advice, the apprenticeships system and removing discrimination and prejudice.
  3. Improve pay for “women’s work”: through valuing important jobs which are done by predominantly female staff, like nursery nurses or carers, by increasing pay, progression and status.
  4. Tackle the motherhood pay penalty: through a combination of tackling pregnancy discrimination, improving access to flexible work, creating more well-paid, high-skilled part-time jobs and giving dads better opportunities to share parental leave and work flexibly so it’s not all about women putting their careers on hold to raise a family.


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